Oct 4, 1990
Detroit - New Jersey3-3 OT

Summary Of Events
1  16:35  Rough  Probert-Stewart
2  23:00  Almost Fight  Probert-Crowder
3  23:00  Scrum    
4  23:00  Fight  Probert-Stewart
5  32:12  Fight  Probert-Crowder
6  32:17  Fight  Barr-Stewart
7  49:10  Cheap Shot  Norwood-MacLean
8  49:12  Scrum    
9  49:12  Fight  Gallant-Albelin

Rough at 16:35
HeightWeightBlood
Added By sonof3m
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Duration N/A
 Bob Probert 6'3'' 4220lb 30None
 Allan Stewart 5'11'' 4190lb 30


Almost Fight at 23:00
HeightWeightBlood
Added By chrisY2J
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Duration N/A
 Bob Probert 6'3'' 1220lb 18None
 Troy Crowder 6'4'' 1238lb 18


Scrum at 23:00
Detroit PlayersNew Jersey Players
Duration N/A  Bob Probert     Troy Crowder  Allan Stewart   
# Players Involved: N/A
Blood: None
   Added By chrisY2J      Log in or Register to edit this event's boxscore      Review this event      Post Message about this event      Loved/Hated/Top 10   


Fight at 23:00
HeightWeightPunchesBlood
Duration 0:30ThrownLanded   Big   
 Bob Probert 6'3'' 4220lb 3027134None
 Allan Stewart 5'11'' 4190lb 30710
   Added By no.7      Log in or Register to edit this event's boxscore      Review this event      Post Message about this event      Loved/Hated/Top 10      Compare these fighters   
PosterReview
 SarcasticPillow
19527 fight reviews
135 fight logs

May 19, 2011 12:55 ET
Bob Probert clear win Fun 
8
Troy Crowder collides with Bob Probert and is angry about it. Crowder goes back to Probert and drops the gloves but the linesmen get in between them so Probert keeps his gloves on. Allan Stewart then gets into it with some of Probert's teammates so Probert goes over to Stewart. They shove each other and then lose the mitts, getting a grip on the other's jersey immediately. Stewart misses a left and then puts his head down as Probert gets the right hand pumping. Probert unloads eleven rights on Stewart, and connecting on eight while Stewart tries to counter once with a left that misses and struggles afterwards to keep his balance and grab a hold of Probert. Probert takes a moment to get himself set again and Stewart is able to throw three rights, landing two as Probert throws two rights with one landing. They then adjust their helmets and Probert misses a right after he's done. Stewart just throws off his own helmet and misses a right that gets him off balance. Probert throws three rights and lands one, then they switch hands. Stewart throws three lefts and lands one as Probert throws three lefts and lands two. Probert gets himself set and gets his left hand pumping, unleashing eleven lefts and connecting on four as Stewart just hangs on and keeps his head down. As Probert goes off he has some words for Crowder who is already in the box. A really one-sided fight with Probert landing far more punches while being in control of the fight from start to finish. Very good fight.
 BattleshipRules
12621 fight reviews

Jul 17, 2013 07:21 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
8
Stewart was always game, but he was overmatched against Probert. Alan was pushing and shoving with several Red Wings before pairing off with Probie. Bob landed a solid right. Alan missed a left. Probert missed a punch, landed an average blow, and landed a solid connect. He missed a couple of blows. He landed a solid right and a pretty good shot.

Stewart missed a left hand. Bob missed a punch and landed a couple of solid punches. Stewart tried to compete the best he could, but he took a pounding along the way. He landed a decent punch, missed a blow, and landed an average right hand. Probert landed a pretty good shot, a solid blow, and a pretty good punch.

Stewart missed a punch and landed a couple of average lefts. He missed a punch. Bob continued to dish out the punishment. He missed a blow, landed an average punch, and landed a solid left hook. He landed a solid shot and a pretty good blow. He landed a solid blow and an average shot. He missed a punch and landed a couple of pretty good blows. The refs decided to call a halt to the proceedings.

I rate this as a decisive win for Probert. Stewart was tough and game, but he took a beating. He was bent over and taking heavy punishment at the end. Most likely, it wouldn't have ended well for him if the refs allowed the contest to continue.
 chrisY2J
1232 fight reviews

Nov 14 17:54 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
8
The Devils' rookie heavyweight Troy Crowder slaps the puck from the blue line. The Detroit goaltender blocks the shot and the puck soars over the glass. Just as the whistle sounds, Red Wings enforcer Bob Probert bumps into Crowder with a stiff shoulder from behind, knocking him off-balance. Crowder doesn't like that and chases after Probert.

Troy hurls aside his gloves and stick, but the officials immediately get in between the two tough guys. Probert keeps his gloves on and appears uninterested in fighting Crowder as a linesman keeps a hold on him. Crowder is escorted to the penalty box right away by the other linesman.

As Troy is put in the sin bin, his teammate Allan Stewart mixes it up with several Red Wings, drawing a crowd of players. A lot of enthusiastic shoving ensues between the Wings and Devils. The officials have their hands full trying to keep everyone separated. Stewart veers close to Probert, who is still being held by a linesman. The two players look at each other. Stewart moves at Probert and drops the gloves. Probert breaks away from the zebra and tosses aside his gloves.

Probert then proceeds to eat Stewart alive, landing punches at will, lefts and rights. The much smaller Stewart feebly tries to answer, but is left hanging onto Probert and desperately trying not to get hurt.

Probert's arms are totally free and clear and he swings away with wild abandon. Stewart perhaps got in one punch while the champ landed over a dozen big shots to the face and skull of the Devil, who was game but clearly out of his league.

This was a total mismatch. It is surprising the officials let it go as long as they did. As Stewart was hunched over, with Probert tattooing his head with uppercuts, the linesmen finally jumped in to stop the beating.

As Probert was brought to the sin bin, he passed by Crowder (already occupying the Jersey penalty box). Crowder had some words for Probert, who talked some trash right back to him. This set the stage for their fight later in the game.
no.7
1291 fight reviews
26 fight logs

Dec 17, 2002 11:41 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
6
A fight so one-sided that it's strange the refs allow it to go on for as long as they did. Probert is all over Stewart, working him over from all sides and angles. He changes hands at will. It's surprising that Stewart not only is left standing by the end of the fight, but even throws some punches of his own. These punches are weak and hardly deflect Probert from inflicting punishment.
mullet
19546 fight reviews

Nov 17, 2004 09:07 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
9
Probert starts hammering Stewart with rights, then in the middle of the fight he switched to the left and landed some great shots on Stewart, before the refs finally think that's enough and put a stop on this beating.
Anthony19
2983 fight reviews

Aug 10, 2005 23:12 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
8
Stewie Got his behind handed to him. Clearly out of his league as Probie just worked him over.
re
9287 fight reviews

Nov 4, 2006 05:26 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
7
Probert kicks this guys ass. He just fills him in Stewart after about 20 sec just covers up.
skylineProbi
52 fight reviews

Feb 8, 2010 12:50 ET
Bob Probert clear win Fun 
8
good boy,probi without meditations went out into an exchange shots and at the end of fight conducted excellent series from 3-4 shots.
TheDanLine
10197 fight reviews

Jul 18, 2012 15:23 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
8
One-sided beatdown. Stewart charges at Probert with the gloves off and the two go at it. It's no contest from the start. Probert just starts feeding Stewart with overhand rights and uppercuts. Probert continues the onslaught when he switches over to his left, pummeling Stewart into submission. The linesmen then come in to Stewart's rescue. Decisive win for Probert.
crosbyXXX
3696 fight reviews

Sep 27, 2012 18:08 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
8
great fight Probert...Stewart clearly has no chance,decisive win Probert
Penguins.Bees.Fan82
3232 fight reviews

Mar 10, 2014 16:28 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
8
SteveTheBossBosse29
3215 fight reviews

May 16, 2014 06:11 ET
Bob Probert clear win Fun 
8
Oneill.the.Giant
11126 fight reviews

Jul 7, 2014 19:12 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
6
FrAn6
3516 fight reviews

Sep 8, 2015 17:17 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
7
itsJ.Millertime
10555 fight reviews

Nov 4, 2015 23:26 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
7
brawler29
1538 fight reviews

Jul 16, 2016 11:50 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
8
supersonic
4666 fight reviews

Apr 9, 2017 07:37 ET
Bob Probert decisive win Fun 
7
scottygiroux
771 fight reviews

Nov 14 15:23 ET
Bob Probert clear win Fun 
8
Messages
chrisY2J
Jul 18, 2012 15:02 ET
It's interesting how a few seconds of video can change your perspective. The only video of this I had showed the fight only, not the buildup to it or the drama between Crowder and Probert. This clip has it all.

You almost can accuse Probert of dodging Crowder, then being only too happy to take on the far inferior Stewart.
Reply
TheDanLine
Jul 18, 2012 15:25 ET
I find it utterly amazing that punching bag Stewart was somehow able to salvage a draw against Link Geatz.Reply
chrisY2J
Jul 18, 2012 21:28 ET
Definitely unexpected!Reply
corson27
Feb 15, 2013 03:49 ET
How much do you know about Al Stewart? I'm guessing not a lot judging by your blanket statement about him being a "punching bag", which is just pure nonsense. He was 5'11 and about 190 pounds but was fearless and took on everybody. He is one of the toughest pound for pound guys that ever laced up the skates. And this just isn't my assessment of him. I talked to a tough guy who played with Stewart for a few years on the Devils and he had nothing but high praise for Stewart and how tough he was for his size.

I actually gave Stewart the narrow in that Gaetz fight. And yes, that fight is a surprise result because Gaetz was a young monster and Stewart was out of his prime, not to mention the fact that Stewart was giving away at least 40 pounds.

But Al Stewart was far from a punching bag. He had a well deserved reputation coming out of junior hockey where he played in the WHL with the Prince Albert Raiders. Then on to the AHL with the Maine Mariners where he played a few seasons and took on all the tough guys the league had to offer. He even got the edge on John Kordic in one bout. I remember getting an NHL/AHL mixed tape in the 80's and the Kordic fight was one of the fights on there. When I saw it for the first time, I was in shock a little bit. I was a huge Kordic fan and didn't know a whole lot about Stewart at the time, but I was expecting Kordic to handle Stewart with ease because Kordic pretty much had his way with most of the tough guys in the AHL. But Stewart had Kordic at arm's length and was throwing straight, left-handed shots at Kordic and a few of them were landing. Kordic threw a few punches himself and a couple of them landed in what was a fairly close fight, but I always viewed that fight as an upset win for Stewart and it really made me take notice of him.

The biggest problem with Al Stewart was his size, obviously. But his biggest asset was his heart and the courage he showed time and time again. In the season when he road shotgun with Troy Crowder, he'd always have to take on the toughest guys on the other team that didn't want to tangle with Crowder. And Stewart did so with reckless abandon, even though the results weren't there.

There is a reason for Stewart's lack of success in the 1990-91 season. Look at his first few fights in the NHL against guys like Rick Tocchet and Scott Stevens. I actually thought Stewart got the edge on Stevens, who was one of the toughest guys in the NHL at the time. The Tocchet fight was pretty close and Stewart also went after one of the all-time legends in Larry Playfair and stood right in there against a much bigger and more experienced fighter and held his own in a pretty close fight that Playfair ended up getting the win in.

The problem is the Devils never kept Stewart up long enough. I'm guessing he didn't have NHL caliber skill and the Devils weren't really known to have a lot of tough guys in the mid-80's, so they buried Stewart in the minors with Maine. In his first 6 years in pro hockey, he only played in 18 regular season games with the Devils. And these were his prime years for fighting. Again, the Devils didn't stock a lot of tough guys until about the 1987-88 season, and even then, guys like Jim Korn and Perry Anderson were a joke and 2 of the biggest backstabbing, jumpers from behind the NHL has ever seen. But I guess they were "better" hockey players or team guys or something and that's why the Devils kept them around, but both Korn and Anderson combined didn't have half the guts Stewart did. With the already tough Ken Daneyko and the emergence of Dave Maley as a solid NHL fighter, Stewart would've been a nice fit on those Devils' teams. But instead, the powers that be kept Stewart down on the farm during his prime years. I'm certain if Stewart would've played at least a couple of seasons in the mid to late 80's, you would've seen a different Stewart then you saw later on.

To make a long story short, Stewart was out of his prime by the time the Devils finally gave him some substantial NHL playing time in 1990-91 when he backed up Troy Crowder on a nightly basis. At this point, Stewart was not equipped to be fighting the NHL's best fighters. Stewart was a heavyweight who played in a middleweight's body and he just couldn't keep up with the demand on him that season. He wasn't big enough and he was out of his prime. He fought 20 times in 41 regular season games and it can be argued that his fight card was better than Crowder's that year. As I said, guys weren't too eager to engage Crowder, who was swathing his path of destruction, so a few of them opted for the smaller and less dangerous fighter in Stewart.

Even though Stewart's win/loss record for the 1990-91 season is terrible, he always stood in there and took the other guy's best shots and hardly ever went down. Look at this fight with Probert, or the McSorley one later on in the year, for that matter. He's fighting guys that are way out of his weight class, and yet he stands right in there and takes a beating, but never tries to bail from the fight, all the while, returning some punches of his own. Stewart had balls the size of watermelons and made from steel.

The only blemish on his resume from that year was an embarrassing loss to Steve Leach. This is when I knew something may be wrong with Stewart, either mentally or physically. The Al Stewart from the 80's would've absolutely murdered a guy like Steve Leach, make no mistake about it. But whatever the case was, there was no excuse for Stewart to lose to one of the worst fighters the NHL has ever seen. Still, I couldn't help but think that something was wrong with Stewart.

Fast forward to the 1991-92 season and Stewart plays the preseason with the Devils and fights Joey Kocur and hangs in there with him in a losing battle, and fights to a draw with Craig Coxe and is easily beaten by Link Gaetz. Then Stewart has the one fight with Dave Brown and again, stands in there in a losing effort, and is traded to the Bruins where he gets into 3 fights in 4 games. Like I said before, I thought Stewart edged out Gaetz in San Jose to get a narrow win. Then Stewart goes into St. Louis and gives Darin Kimble all he can handle in a great, even fight.

At this point, you can't accuse Stewart of picking his spots. Including the preseason, of Stewart's 8 fights in 1991-91, he fought Link Gaetz twice, Joey Kocur, Dave Brown, Darin Kimble and Craig Coxe. And other than the 1st Gaetz fight in the preseason, he held his own in all of the other fights which included 3 of the best fighters to ever lace them up in Brown, Kocur and Gaetz.

And then Stewart all of a sudden retires. We later find out that Stewart was suffering from depression. And there's rumours that he went back to his hometown of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, and was seen working at a local gas station pumping gas. Another rumour had Stewart joining a monastery in an effort to become a monk. I'm not sure if these rumours were ever officially substantiated, but I remember there appeared to be enough evidence at the time that some of this was true. I seem to recall The Hockey News mentioning something about Stewart wanting to become a monk.

Anyway, it was clear that Stewart was dealing with some mental issues at that time that made him take a step back from the game and re-evaluate his life. And I can't say I blame him. Here was a guy who was an undersized tough guy who fought the biggest and the best fighters the game threw at him, but never really seemed to get the respect he deserved. He made a brief comeback the following year attending Winnipeg Jets training camp and playing in the preseason and getting into a few fights but didn't crack the line-up. He was sent down to Moncton of the AHL where he continued to fight some of the best in the minors like Serge Roberge, Rudy Poeschek, Francois Leroux, etc.

So I guess the point I've tried to make in this extended post on Al Stewart is that I take offense to somebody making a blanket statement of his fighting skills by calling him a "punching bag" when it's obvious they know very little about what they are talking about.

In closing, Al Stewart was an undersized guy who feared no one and even though he was over-matched most of the time, he always stepped up to the plate to do battle with the toughest guys on the other team. He may not have won a lot of his fights, but when you are 5'11 and 190 pounds and you're fighting the guys he fought, you can't expect him to do much better than he did. And yet, he always hung in there and tried to return fire and never gave an inch to the biggest and the baddest mofos that the game could throw at him. So to simply call Al Stewart a "punching bag" is doing a huge disservice to the guy and is a slap in the face to him and all of us hockey fight fans that know how tough Al Stewart really was. A guy like him should be praised and his accomplishments noted, instead of being marginalized by such an inaccurate statement based on an ignorance of his career in it's totality.

Needless to say, they don't make them like Al Stewart anymore.
Reply
TheDanLine
Feb 15, 2013 10:04 ET
Ok, he was entertaining, but during his time in the NHL, he was a punching bag, there is no disputing that. He had a record of 3-21-8, that means you're a punching bag.Reply
corson27
Feb 15, 2013 17:20 ET
You come back with a 2 sentence reply after I tried at length (15 paragraphs) to educate you on how tough Al Stewart was. And all you can do is point to his win/loss record in the NHL as a cold, hard fact that he was a "punching bag". I'm guessing your a younger guy in this hobby and know nothing about Al Stewart other than a few hockey fight clips you've seen of him on the internet. You've got a lot to learn.Reply
TheDanLine
Feb 15, 2013 20:06 ET
Um, I know exactly what I'm talking about and I've been watching hockey and hockey fights for years. We get it, you're a Stewart fan, but saying he wasn't a punching bag during his time in the NHL is beyond delusional.Reply
DerDiggler
May 28, 2013 18:57 ET
This is a pussy move by Probert. Ducking Crowder, then accepting Stewart's challenge seconds later. Karma strikes later in the game though as Crowder works him over.Reply
itsJ.Millertime
Nov 4, 2015 23:17 ET
Quote from message by corson27
How much do you know about Al Stewart? I'm guessing not a lot judging by your blanket statement about him being a "punching bag", which is just pure nonsense. He was 5'11 and about 190 pounds but was fearless and took on everybody. He is one of the toughest pound for pound guys that ever laced up the skates. And this just isn't my assessment of him. I talked to a tough guy who played with Stewart for a few years on the Devils and he had nothing but high praise for Stewart and how tough he was for his size.

I actually gave Stewart the narrow in that Gaetz fight. And yes, that fight is a surprise result because Gaetz was a young monster and Stewart was out of his prime, not to mention the fact that Stewart was giving away at least 40 pounds.

But Al Stewart was far from a punching bag. He had a well deserved reputation coming out of junior hockey where he played in the WHL with the Prince Albert Raiders. Then on to the AHL with the Maine Mariners where he played a few seasons and took on all the tough guys the league had to offer. He even got the edge on John Kordic in one bout. I remember getting an NHL/AHL mixed tape in the 80's and the Kordic fight was one of the fights on there. When I saw it for the first time, I was in shock a little bit. I was a huge Kordic fan and didn't know a whole lot about Stewart at the time, but I was expecting Kordic to handle Stewart with ease because Kordic pretty much had his way with most of the tough guys in the AHL. But Stewart had Kordic at arm's length and was throwing straight, left-handed shots at Kordic and a few of them were landing. Kordic threw a few punches himself and a couple of them landed in what was a fairly close fight, but I always viewed that fight as an upset win for Stewart and it really made me take notice of him.

The biggest problem with Al Stewart was his size, obviously. But his biggest asset was his heart and the courage he showed time and time again. In the season when he road shotgun with Troy Crowder, he'd always have to take on the toughest guys on the other team that didn't want to tangle with Crowder. And Stewart did so with reckless abandon, even though the results weren't there.

There is a reason for Stewart's lack of success in the 1990-91 season. Look at his first few fights in the NHL against guys like Rick Tocchet and Scott Stevens. I actually thought Stewart got the edge on Stevens, who was one of the toughest guys in the NHL at the time. The Tocchet fight was pretty close and Stewart also went after one of the all-time legends in Larry Playfair and stood right in there against a much bigger and more experienced fighter and held his own in a pretty close fight that Playfair ended up getting the win in.

The problem is the Devils never kept Stewart up long enough. I'm guessing he didn't have NHL caliber skill and the Devils weren't really known to have a lot of tough guys in the mid-80's, so they buried Stewart in the minors with Maine. In his first 6 years in pro hockey, he only played in 18 regular season games with the Devils. And these were his prime years for fighting. Again, the Devils didn't stock a lot of tough guys until about the 1987-88 season, and even then, guys like Jim Korn and Perry Anderson were a joke and 2 of the biggest backstabbing, jumpers from behind the NHL has ever seen. But I guess they were "better" hockey players or team guys or something and that's why the Devils kept them around, but both Korn and Anderson combined didn't have half the guts Stewart did. With the already tough Ken Daneyko and the emergence of Dave Maley as a solid NHL fighter, Stewart would've been a nice fit on those Devils' teams. But instead, the powers that be kept Stewart down on the farm during his prime years. I'm certain if Stewart would've played at least a couple of seasons in the mid to late 80's, you would've seen a different Stewart then you saw later on.

To make a long story short, Stewart was out of his prime by the time the Devils finally gave him some substantial NHL playing time in 1990-91 when he backed up Troy Crowder on a nightly basis. At this point, Stewart was not equipped to be fighting the NHL's best fighters. Stewart was a heavyweight who played in a middleweight's body and he just couldn't keep up with the demand on him that season. He wasn't big enough and he was out of his prime. He fought 20 times in 41 regular season games and it can be argued that his fight card was better than Crowder's that year. As I said, guys weren't too eager to engage Crowder, who was swathing his path of destruction, so a few of them opted for the smaller and less dangerous fighter in Stewart.

Even though Stewart's win/loss record for the 1990-91 season is terrible, he always stood in there and took the other guy's best shots and hardly ever went down. Look at this fight with Probert, or the McSorley one later on in the year, for that matter. He's fighting guys that are way out of his weight class, and yet he stands right in there and takes a beating, but never tries to bail from the fight, all the while, returning some punches of his own. Stewart had balls the size of watermelons and made from steel.

The only blemish on his resume from that year was an embarrassing loss to Steve Leach. This is when I knew something may be wrong with Stewart, either mentally or physically. The Al Stewart from the 80's would've absolutely murdered a guy like Steve Leach, make no mistake about it. But whatever the case was, there was no excuse for Stewart to lose to one of the worst fighters the NHL has ever seen. Still, I couldn't help but think that something was wrong with Stewart.

Fast forward to the 1991-92 season and Stewart plays the preseason with the Devils and fights Joey Kocur and hangs in there with him in a losing battle, and fights to a draw with Craig Coxe and is easily beaten by Link Gaetz. Then Stewart has the one fight with Dave Brown and again, stands in there in a losing effort, and is traded to the Bruins where he gets into 3 fights in 4 games. Like I said before, I thought Stewart edged out Gaetz in San Jose to get a narrow win. Then Stewart goes into St. Louis and gives Darin Kimble all he can handle in a great, even fight.

At this point, you can't accuse Stewart of picking his spots. Including the preseason, of Stewart's 8 fights in 1991-91, he fought Link Gaetz twice, Joey Kocur, Dave Brown, Darin Kimble and Craig Coxe. And other than the 1st Gaetz fight in the preseason, he held his own in all of the other fights which included 3 of the best fighters to ever lace them up in Brown, Kocur and Gaetz.

And then Stewart all of a sudden retires. We later find out that Stewart was suffering from depression. And there's rumours that he went back to his hometown of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, and was seen working at a local gas station pumping gas. Another rumour had Stewart joining a monastery in an effort to become a monk. I'm not sure if these rumours were ever officially substantiated, but I remember there appeared to be enough evidence at the time that some of this was true. I seem to recall The Hockey News mentioning something about Stewart wanting to become a monk.

Anyway, it was clear that Stewart was dealing with some mental issues at that time that made him take a step back from the game and re-evaluate his life. And I can't say I blame him. Here was a guy who was an undersized tough guy who fought the biggest and the best fighters the game threw at him, but never really seemed to get the respect he deserved. He made a brief comeback the following year attending Winnipeg Jets training camp and playing in the preseason and getting into a few fights but didn't crack the line-up. He was sent down to Moncton of the AHL where he continued to fight some of the best in the minors like Serge Roberge, Rudy Poeschek, Francois Leroux, etc.

So I guess the point I've tried to make in this extended post on Al Stewart is that I take offense to somebody making a blanket statement of his fighting skills by calling him a "punching bag" when it's obvious they know very little about what they are talking about.

In closing, Al Stewart was an undersized guy who feared no one and even though he was over-matched most of the time, he always stepped up to the plate to do battle with the toughest guys on the other team. He may not have won a lot of his fights, but when you are 5'11 and 190 pounds and you're fighting the guys he fought, you can't expect him to do much better than he did. And yet, he always hung in there and tried to return fire and never gave an inch to the biggest and the baddest mofos that the game could throw at him. So to simply call Al Stewart a "punching bag" is doing a huge disservice to the guy and is a slap in the face to him and all of us hockey fight fans that know how tough Al Stewart really was. A guy like him should be praised and his accomplishments noted, instead of being marginalized by such an inaccurate statement based on an ignorance of his career in it's totality.

Needless to say, they don't make them like Al Stewart anymore.



Damn, you must be one hell of an Al Stewart fan. Either that or your his dad or brother.
Reply
BattleshipRules
Nov 5, 2015 17:53 ET
Don't forget. In addition to being a fighter, Al Stewart sang famous songs like "Time Passages" and "The Year of the Cat."Reply
corson27
Nov 8, 2015 07:16 ET (later updated)
J.Millertime, I've been a life long Montreal Canadiens fan and never had an affinity for Al Stewart, or any other tough guy on other teams in the NHL. My favourites were Nilan, Kordic, Corson, Odelein, Ewen, etc., basically any tough guy who put on a Habs' uniform in those days. It's only been since this shitty NHL product of the last 10 years or so has me reminiscing about the good ole days and it's made me appreciate the tough guys that weren't necessarily on the team I cheered for. And one of those guys that I've gained a lot of respect for, in hindsight, is Al Stewart, for the lengthy reasons I gave in my unintentional epic length previous post. For this TheDanLine poster to simply categorize Al Stewart as nothing more than a punching bag is not an accurate assessment of the man as a fighter. Anybody who stands in there with Link Gaetz and at worst, gets a draw, is not what I'd consider a punching bag. But what would I know? I've only spent 25 years in this hobby and I have more fight tapes/DVDs than I care to count.

Battleship, I remember when Al Stewart was trying out for the Winnipeg Jets and in one of his preseason fights, the sports announcer said something like "it's year of the cat" referring to Al Stewart. I'm guessing not too many people got the reference.
Reply
BattleshipRules
Nov 8, 2015 07:45 ET
I agree with you about Stewart. He was very tough. I don't think it is accurate at all to call him a punching bag. He lost a good amount of fights, but he fought the toughest guys around. His performance against Gaetz should earn him great respect.Reply
itsJ.Millertime
Nov 8, 2015 11:15 ET
Quote from message by corson27
J.Millertime, I've been a life long Montreal Canadiens fan and never had an affinity for Al Stewart, or any other tough guy on other teams in the NHL. My favourites were Nilan, Kordic, Corson, Odelein, Ewen, etc., basically any tough guy who put on a Habs' uniform in those days. It's only been since this shitty NHL product of the last 10 years or so has me reminiscing about the good ole days and it's made me appreciate the tough guys that weren't necessarily on the team I cheered for. And one of those guys that I've gained a lot of respect for, in hindsight, is Al Stewart, for the lengthy reasons I gave in my unintentional epic length previous post. For this TheDanLine poster to simply categorize Al Stewart as nothing more than a punching bag is not an accurate assessment of the man as a fighter. Anybody who stands in there with Link Gaetz and at worst, gets a draw, is not what I'd consider a punching bag. But what would I know? I've only spent 25 years in this hobby and I have more fight tapes/DVDs than I care to count.

Battleship, I remember when Al Stewart was trying out for the Winnipeg Jets and in one of his preseason fights, the sports announcer said something like "it's year of the cat" referring to Al Stewart. I'm guessing not too many people got the reference.
No doubt the guy was first class tough and I agree to simply call him a "punching bag" without giving credit for fighting the toughest around is doing him a tremendous disservice. I pretty much love and respect all the tough guys who've played this sport, especially the ones who played it when the sport itself was tough and only tough guys could play. Guys like Stewart who regularly fought guys 20-40lbs heavier and several inches taller deserve all the credit in the world for doing the job they did!

Battleship, I thought you were joking about him singing the songs but I guess you were serious and he really did sing them?
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BattleshipRules
Nov 8, 2015 11:19 ET
No, I was just kidding. There was a famous folk-pop singer Al Stewart who was out in the 1970's. A little before my time, but he had a couple of songs on soft rock and oldies stations. Just showing my age a bit.Reply
BattleshipRules
Nov 8, 2015 11:21 ET
"Time passages...buy me a ticket on the last train home tonight."Reply
itsJ.Millertime
Nov 8, 2015 11:26 ET
Oh okay, I know those songs and have heard them often since I'm nearing the tender age of 50 rapidly (I'm 49) and listen to the "oldies/classics" stations pretty much all the time.Reply
BattleshipRules
Nov 8, 2015 11:32 ET
I'm 41, so you have me beat by a few years. I'm kind of an old soul. I like the music from the 60's, 70's, and 80's. I got my dad an autographed book by John Fogarty. I can't wait to see his face Christmas Day. He saw CCR live at the garden back in the day.Reply
itsJ.Millertime
Nov 8, 2015 11:46 ET (later updated)
Very, very cool gift. You're dad is going to love it! CCR is one of my favorites of all time. While I have you here much respect to you on your reviews, you really put a lot of time and effort into them. I used to do that but not much anymore, I still enjoy the fights tremendously but there never seems time to put full effort into the reviews. Sign of my old age I suppose.Reply
BattleshipRules
Nov 8, 2015 11:54 ET
Thanks buddy. I appreciate it.Reply
TheDanLine
Jul 16, 2016 12:02 ET
Quote from message by corson27
For this TheDanLine poster to simply categorize Al Stewart as nothing more than a punching bag is not an accurate assessment of the man as a fighter.
Because he is a punching bag, this isn't hard to understand. Not rocket science. He's in the same class or lower than Cam Russell, who was able to get a win over Probert.
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corson27
Jul 17, 2016 23:56 ET
Well, both the posters BattleshipRules and itsJ.Millertime don't think Stewart is a punching bag, either. So I guess you're in the minority.Reply
TheDanLine
Jul 18, 2016 00:17 ET
Yeah they do, everyone does. Except you. His record and fights speak for itself. He's a bigger punching bag than Jim Cummins, Kelly Buchberger, and Cam Russell. That says a lot. Hell, Scott Daniels would probably beat on his head like a drum, and Daniels was a pillow puncher. Reply
corson27
Jul 18, 2016 00:32 ET (later updated)
You obviously didn't read Battleship or JMiller's posts in this thread because they both said that Al Stewart isn't a punching bag. Scroll up and take a look.

I'm not sure why you're responding to a post that was over a year ago and looking to pick a fight, but whatever the case may be, you're not going to change my opinion on Stewart. He had a lousy year in 1990-91 when New Jersey finally gave him some games to play after he toiled in the minors during his best fighting days and he had to fight ever team's heavyweight who didn't want to tangle with Troy Crowder. His few early NHL fights tell the tale, a loss to Larry Playfair in a close fight and 2 draws against Rick Tocchet and Scott Stevens.

For his size, Stewart was as tough as they came.
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TheDanLine
Jul 18, 2016 00:49 ET (later updated)
I read their posts. They know he's a punching bag, they just wanted to put into context. I'm not saying he wasn't tough, because he obviously was. However, to say he wasn't a punching bag is just completely asinine. He got pounded by Steve Leach. Steve Fucking Leach. You lose to someone like him and that's saying something, and it most certainly isn't good. Unless you live on bizarro world where up is down, left is right, right is wrong, water is dry, and the sky is neon clear, then Al Stewart is without a shadow of a doubt an epitome of a punching bag. BTW, he lost those fights against Tocchet and Stevens.Reply
corson27
Jul 19, 2016 00:35 ET
The Stevens fight was a straight up draw. I don't care that 2 reviewers on this site gave Stevens the narrow win. I'll give Tocchet the edge in that fight for landing a good punch towards the end, but most of the fight is from a bad camera angle.

I can't tell you why Stewart lost to Steve Leach in that fight. A prime Stewart would pummel Leach more times than not. Losing to Leach is embarrassing, no doubt, but a guy can get lucky once in awhile. Leach had the odd win and a few draws with some decent fighters.

I'm not about to label a guy like Stewart a punching bag based on a few bad fights. Like I mentioned in my previous posts, he edged John Kordic in an AHL fight, had draws with Link Gaetz, Darin Kimble, Scott Stevens, Jay Miller, etc. and held his own against the likes of Joey Kocur and Dave Brown. And I thought he got the best of Craig Coxe in the preseason of 1991 and got the win, despite 3 out of 4 reviewers on here calling it a draw.

As I mentioned, Stewart had a lousy year in 1990-91. He was fighting so much that year behind Troy Crowder and taking on a heavy load for a guy who was a light-heavyweight at best. Maybe Stewart wasn't revved up for the fight against Leach. Maybe he lost a contact lens and couldn't see Leach's face in order to punch it. Who knows? Stewart was going through a bunch of issues at the time. He was having depression issues and if I remember correctly, was getting tired of being put out on the ice just to fight. And almost everybody he fought was much bigger than him. There was also a rumor floating around that Stewart wanted to become a monk.

But I know, excuses, excuses, he should beat a guy like Leach, one of the worst fighters the NHL has ever seen. Interestingly enough, I just took a look at Stewart's fight card from the AHL (which is incomplete, it doesn't have the Kordic fight, for example) and he fought Leach in the 1986-87 season when Stewart was with Maine and Leach was with Binghamton. Later on in the game, Stewart fought Shawn Cronin. Unfortunately, I don't believe the fights from this game exist on tape. But I'm guessing it went down something like this scenario. Stewart beat the crap out of Leach early in the 1st period, so to avenge his teammates loss, Cronin went after Stewart midway through the game. And Stewart, who was immensely tough and a great fighter in Maine, probably held his own against Cronin. Without any available footage, who knows? But one thing I do know is that to call Al Stewart a "punching bag" doesn't jive with me and isn't a true representation of the caliber of fighter that Stewart was. He was much more than that.
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TheDanLine
Jul 19, 2016 10:01 ET
I also didn't address that fight against Playfair, Stewart got worked, it wasn't close and you know it. Stop trying to make excuses for him. Same thing goes for his fight against Dave Brown, it wasn't close as Stewart got pummeled throughout the fight, he threw a few weak punches in the end and that's it. Those were two one-sided beatdowns. Haven't seen his fight against John Kordic but judging by your previous calls on fights regarding Stewart your judgment is sketchy at best. You always seem to give him the benefit of the doubt for some reason. Are you his boyfriend? You're also making an excuse for his fight against Leach. You just don't lose a fight to a guy to Leach. Like Ever. What we all know is that during his time in the NHL, Stewart was in fact a punching bag. There is no disputing that.Reply
EC
Jul 19, 2016 13:05 ET
Quote from message by TheDanLine
What we all know is that during his time in the NHL, Stewart was in fact a punching bag. There is no disputing that.
If I may interject, let me point something out. Stewart is classified as a light-heavyweight but I think that is very generous. At 5'11 and 190 pounds, he is closer to a middleweight in my opinion. Stewart was basically a middleweight who stepped way out of his weight class to fight much bigger heavyweights, some of which were pure animals. In only 64 NHL games, Stewart fought Bob Probert, Larry Playfair, Dave Brown, Link Gaetz, Craig Berube, Ken Baumgartner, Mick Vukota, Marty McSorley, Shawn Cronin, Gord Donnelly, Mike Peluso, and Jay Miller. That is quite the fight card for a middleweight!

Regarding the punching bag debate, I say there are some factors that need to be considered. If you go strictly by Stewart's fight card and the results, he is undoubtedly a punching bag. However when you factor in that almost all of his opponents were bigger and completely out of his weight class, I think it is unfair to call Stewart a punching bag. His record is so poor because he took on such solid competition. If Stewart had fought mainly within his weight class, he would have a much better record. I hesitate to call Stewart a punching bag because of that fact. You are inevitably going to have a bad record if you are always fighting bigger fighters out of your weight class.
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corson27
Jul 19, 2016 15:18 ET (later updated)
The Playfair and Brown fights were one-sided beatdowns? OK, you've got all the answers. We'll call you Mr. Fight Guru. lmao

Listen, I've tried to be reasonable with you but you're picking a fight here. Calling me Stewart's boyfriend? I don't know what your agenda is, but if you want to fight, I'll go back and forth all day long. You seem to think your an expert on hockey fights. It seems to me you only review fights of videos posted on the internet. How about you do things the old fashion way and make a few trades for some fight tapes and then you can come back with your new found knowledge and some sense of reason.

You haven't seen the Kordic-Stewart fight? Geez, I saw that fight 30 years ago already when I got a fight tape from Robert LeBlanc from Quebec who advertised out of The Hockey News all those years ago. The fact that you haven't even seen that fight tells me you're a rookie out of your league here and that you have a lot of homework to do. Watching hockey fights on the internet won't cut the mustard.
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TheDanLine
Jul 19, 2016 18:03 ET (later updated)
Yes, the fights against Brown and Playfair were one-sided. You have to be a complete homer to say otherwise. I asked jokingly if you were Stewart's boyfriend because I've never seen anybody come to the defense of someone who was obviously a horrendous fighter at the NHL level. There is no disputing that. He had 49 fights at the NHL level with a record of 3-21-8. That's atrocious. That's Tom Kostopoulos territory. It's interesting how you want to change the subject and challenge my hockey fight knowledge. That's pretty pathetic. So what if I haven't seen the Kordic-Stewart fight? Who cares. It's ironic you're calling me "out of my league" yet you can't even call someone who's an obvious speed-bag in Stewart. You need to quit while you're behind and chill with your fetish of Allan Stewart.Reply
TheDanLine
Jul 19, 2016 18:05 ET
Quote from message by EC
Regarding the punching bag debate, I say there are some factors that need to be considered. If you go strictly by Stewart's fight card and the results, he is undoubtedly a punching bag.
That's all that needs to be said.
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corson27
Jul 19, 2016 21:11 ET
Hey EC, you're a Buffalo Sabres fan. Would you call the Stewart-Playfair fight a "one-sided beatdown?" As far as the Dave Brown fight goes, Brown throws a bunch of lefts for the 1st half of the fight, landing very little and as soon as Stewart gathers himself (against a guy 6 inches taller and 30 pounds heavier, no less), he starts to gain some momentum and throw a few himself, landing a couple and then all of a sudden (as he was apt to do when he started to lose a fight), Brown gets Bambi legs and appears to struggle with Stewart's strength as Brown flops around like a fish out of water. A "one-sided beatdown"? When Stewart is on top at the end and wants to continue the fight and Brown pulls the chute? What a joke.

And you're obviously a Flyers homer. I have no affinity to Al Stewart or the New Jersey Devils whatsoever. I've always been a Montreal Canadiens fan. But when someone makes such a blanket statement about a guy as tough as Stewart, then that absurdity needs to be addressed.

I'm guessing you've never played hockey in your life. If you did, you wouldn't call any of these guys a punching bag, let alone Al Stewart. Guys that have played hockey (like myself) realize how tough these guys are, especially a guy like Stewart who fought the toughest heavyweights there were, and then some know-it-all guy like yourself (whose probably never been in a hockey fight) comes along and thinks he can just get away with calling a guy a punching bag. Like you'd have any clue what it's like to be in a hockey fight.

I tell you what, I'll do a poll on here with the members of this site and we'll see how many think Al Stewart is a punching bag. You said I was the only 1 and so far I've proved to you that both Battleship and JMiller don't think he's a punching bag. That's 3 so far.
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TheDanLine
Jul 19, 2016 23:58 ET (later updated)
You're a funny guy. Both fights against Playfair and Brown were both one-sided wins in their favor. Stewart got worked. That's all. There's no need for you to make excuses for them. Brown got "bambi" legs and he was "apt to do when he started to lose a fight"? What the fuck are you even talking about? Dave Brown was in no way shape or form known as someone who would routinely bail in fights. See what I mean? It's like you live in a bizarro world. You have a tenuous relationship with the truth. I'm a Flyers homer? Bahahaha! That's typical of someone who has no argument. That's like someone screaming "RACIST" when they know they've lost. You're grasping at straws. You may not have an "affinity" for the Devils, but you certainly have a man crush on Stewart for some strange reason. There was no absurdity coming from what I said. During his time in the NHL, Stewart was a punching bag. Period. There is no point in you trying to argue otherwise. I have played hockey, started when I was a kid. As a matter of fact, someone who I played with (TJ Brennan) was just signed by the Flyers. So I can't call someone a punching bag? Why not? Why can't I call at like it is? For the record, I have been in hockey fights, probably more than you. Much like Stewart, you're a punching bag when it comes to trying to debate me on this issue. You make up things as you go along. Most people would agree with me that Stewart is a punching bag. Both Battleship and Jmiller know that Stewart is a punching bag, they just wanted to put it into context that he fought bigger players. Great. Doesn't change the fact he got his head kicked in 90% of the time. Guess what? That makes you a punching bag. So go ahead, make your poll so we can all laugh at you.Reply
corson27
Jul 20, 2016 01:14 ET (later updated)
First off, who do you think you're talking to? Secondly, are you homophobic? It seems you are, thinking Stewart is my "girlfriend" and I have a "man crush" on him. Seriously, quit turning this into a "gay" thing. You have a one track mind.

Brown didn't like to get hit in the face, period. And look at him lose his legs twice in the Stewart fight. Brown throws a bunch of back of the helmet punches and not once does Stewart go down and as soon as Stewart gets off some punches, Brown has "balance" issues. Check out Brown's fight with Todd Ewen for further reference on his lack of balance when he started to lose a fight. Dave Brown was one of the toughest ever but he is not immune to scrutiny. If Brown would've had a jersey with a loose left sleeve, Stewart would've probably beat him.

Why do you have such a hate on for Al Stewart? Did he not give you an autograph one time? And somebody who claims to have been in a bunch of hockey fights wouldn't call somebody like Stewart a punching bag. I've talked to a couple of Stewart's ex-teammates (both tough guys) with the Devils and they both mentioned Stewart as being one of the toughest guys they ever played with. They would simply laugh in your face if you told them you thought that Stewart was a punching bag.
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corson27
Jul 20, 2016 01:20 ET
Quote from message by BattleshipRules
I agree with you about Stewart. He was very tough. I don't think it is accurate at all to call him a punching bag. He lost a good amount of fights, but he fought the toughest guys around. His performance against Gaetz should earn him great respect.
"I don't think it is accurate at all to call him a punching bag." That's straight from BattleshipRule's quote. So you're saying he didn't mean to say this? Are you putting words in his mouth? I think Battleship told you very precisely what he thinks of Al Stewart.
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TheDanLine
Jul 20, 2016 01:48 ET
You seem oddly obsessed with Stewart for some reason. I don't know. You tell me? I don't care one way or the other.

You're unbelievable. You make it seem like Brown went down on purpose against Stewart which doesn't make any sense whatsoever. Brown spent the majority of the fight pounding on Stewart, then Stewart flails with a few weak punches of no consequence. It would be much easier if you were to say Stewart got hammered in that fight and move on. You're just embarrassing yourself further. Then you say Stewart would have beaten Brown if Brown didn't have a tightened sleeve. Answer this question. Are you on drugs? If you are, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt. I don't hate Al Stewart. He had guts and fought guys that were bigger than him. But guess what? He was a punching bag. There's no other way to see it. Tie Domi and Stan Jonathan were smaller than pretty much everyone else they fought, but they weren't even close to being punching bags. Is it finally sinking in for you now? Are you starting to see what I'm getting at? Yes? No? Maybe so?
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TheDanLine
Jul 20, 2016 01:49 ET
Quote from message by corson27
"I don't think it is accurate at all to call him a punching bag." That's straight from BattleshipRule's quote. So you're saying he didn't mean to say this? Are you putting words in his mouth? I think Battleship told you very precisely what he thinks of Al Stewart.
He knows he's a punching bag, he wanted to put it into context that he fought tougher players. Not hard to understand.
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EC
Jul 20, 2016 15:58 ET
Quote from message by corson27
Hey EC, you're a Buffalo Sabres fan. Would you call the Stewart-Playfair fight a "one-sided beatdown?"
I wouldn't call it a beatdown but it certainly was one-sided. Stewart bravely hung in there and tried to trade punches with Playfair but Playfair beat him convincingly. Playfair landed several more punches, some of which put some hurt on Stewart.
Quote from message by corson27
As far as the Dave Brown fight goes, Brown throws a bunch of lefts for the 1st half of the fight, landing very little and as soon as Stewart gathers himself (against a guy 6 inches taller and 30 pounds heavier, no less), he starts to gain some momentum and throw a few himself, landing a couple and then all of a sudden (as he was apt to do when he started to lose a fight), Brown gets Bambi legs and appears to struggle with Stewart's strength as Brown flops around like a fish out of water. A "one-sided beatdown"? When Stewart is on top at the end and wants to continue the fight and Brown pulls the chute? What a joke.
This is where I disagree with you Corson. I've agreed with a lot of what you've said and you have made some well reasoned arguments. However Brown did not "pull the chute" in that fight (or any fight that he was ever in for that matter). Brown did not "land very little", he connected with numerous punches. Stewart did hang in there and deserves credit for that. However he barely connected with any punches at all. Brown landed most of the blows before stumbling and falling to the ice. He did NOT bail on the fight! I'm surprised that a respectable user like yourself would accuse Dave Brown of all people of such a thing.
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EC
Jul 20, 2016 16:13 ET
Quote from message by corson27
Brown didn't like to get hit in the face, period
Someone who goes toe-to-toe with a prime Bob Probert, and guys like Jay Miller and Darin Kimble is obviously not afraid to take a punch. Brown would not have had such a wide open style if he were afraid to get hit in the face.
Quote from message by corson27
And look at him lose his legs twice in the Stewart fight. Brown throws a bunch of back of the helmet punches and not once does Stewart go down and as soon as Stewart gets off some punches, Brown has "balance" issues.
Did you seriously just accuse Dave Brown of bailing against Al Stewart of all people? Brown beat some seriously tough customers in his day. He would not bail on a fight against a much smaller middleweight.
Quote from message by corson27
Check out Brown's fight with Todd Ewen for further reference on his lack of balance when he started to lose a fight.
The two men got in tight and were wrestling. Both men had balance issues as they were jockeying for position. Brown did not have "balance issues" because he was trying to bail on the fight.
Quote from message by corson27
If Brown would've had a jersey with a loose left sleeve, Stewart would've probably beat him.
Corson you normally have some excellent posts and make great points, but I can't take this one seriously. Are you seriously saying that a middleweight like Al Stewart was going to beat a prime Dave Brown? Tougher men like John Kordic, Tie Domi, Ken Baumgartner, Jay Miller, and Mick Vukota couldn't do it in that season, yet Stewart could? I'm sorry but that's absolutely ridiculous! Stewart would never beat Brown even on his best day! It's one thing to say Stewart wasn't a punching bag. You've made some solid points with that argument but to say that Stewart would probably beat Dave Brown is absurd!
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corson27
Jul 21, 2016 03:14 ET
EC, I didn't use the word "bail" to describe Brown, I was talking about his balance issues once the fight started to go in his opponent's favour. And thanks for mentioning the fight with Probert, another example of Brown losing his leg strength in the latter portions of the fight. A great fight, though, and it proved Probert to be #1 in the league at that moment in time, for anyone who thought that Brown should hold that position.

I was joking about Stewart beating Brown but I don't like the fact Brown had his jersey altered so his left sleeve was so tight. He was lefty beast who was tough enough to beat straight up, let alone him having an unfair advantage with the sleeve. Mind you, the league never ruled against Brown and the refs never gave him a penalty for it, so I suppose it's not the worst thing I've seen guys do to get an advantage in a hockey fight. Rob Ray redefined what it meant to cheat in a hockey fight, but to his credit, he surprisingly became a pretty solid NHL heavyweight after the NHL took away his ejection button on his jersey and shoulder pads.

TheDanLine, addressing your comment about smaller fighters doing well against heavyweights, Domi was short but he had to be at least 210-215 pounds. Stewart is listed here as weighing 190, but I've seen him in fights where the announcers said he was 175-185 range. Domi was a heavyweight and he fought heavyweights. Stewart was a light-heavyweight at best but more or less was a middleweight who went after the best heavyweights the NHL had to offer and always stood in there and hardly ever went down. If you want to call him a "punching bag", then so be it. I'm not gonna change your mind. Call me crazy but anybody that stands in there and trades them with Link Gaetz and fights him to a draw, there's something to be said for a performance like that. Would Steve Leach fight Gaetz to a draw? Maybe if Leach was allowed to use a baseball bat, he'd still be lucky to come out of it alive.
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TheDanLine
Jul 21, 2016 14:16 ET
Quote from message by corson27
TheDanLine, addressing your comment about smaller fighters doing well against heavyweights, Domi was short but he had to be at least 210-215 pounds. Stewart is listed here as weighing 190, but I've seen him in fights where the announcers said he was 175-185 range. Domi was a heavyweight and he fought heavyweights. Stewart was a light-heavyweight at best but more or less was a middleweight who went after the best heavyweights the NHL had to offer and always stood in there and hardly ever went down. If you want to call him a "punching bag", then so be it. I'm not gonna change your mind. Call me crazy but anybody that stands in there and trades them with Link Gaetz and fights him to a draw, there's something to be said for a performance like that. Would Steve Leach fight Gaetz to a draw? Maybe if Leach was allowed to use a baseball bat, he'd still be lucky to come out of it alive.
What about Stan Jonathan? What about Rick Rypien? What about Brett Gallant? What about Michael Haley? All of those guys are the same size or even smaller than Stewart was. How did they do in comparison? You and I both know what the answer is. None of them were even close to being speed-bags, they're all good fighters in their own right. Stewart was entertaining and game, but let's face facts: he was a garbage fighter.
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TheDanLine
Aug 16, 2016 20:59 ET
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racersno5clackson
Dec 22, 2016 12:37 ET
Quote from message by corson27
How much do you know about Al Stewart? I'm guessing not a lot judging by your blanket statement about him being a "punching bag", which is just pure nonsense. He was 5'11 and about 190 pounds but was fearless and took on everybody. He is one of the toughest pound for pound guys that ever laced up the skates. And this just isn't my assessment of him. I talked to a tough guy who played with Stewart for a few years on the Devils and he had nothing but high praise for Stewart and how tough he was for his size.

I actually gave Stewart the narrow in that Gaetz fight. And yes, that fight is a surprise result because Gaetz was a young monster and Stewart was out of his prime, not to mention the fact that Stewart was giving away at least 40 pounds.

But Al Stewart was far from a punching bag. He had a well deserved reputation coming out of junior hockey where he played in the WHL with the Prince Albert Raiders. Then on to the AHL with the Maine Mariners where he played a few seasons and took on all the tough guys the league had to offer. He even got the edge on John Kordic in one bout. I remember getting an NHL/AHL mixed tape in the 80's and the Kordic fight was one of the fights on there. When I saw it for the first time, I was in shock a little bit. I was a huge Kordic fan and didn't know a whole lot about Stewart at the time, but I was expecting Kordic to handle Stewart with ease because Kordic pretty much had his way with most of the tough guys in the AHL. But Stewart had Kordic at arm's length and was throwing straight, left-handed shots at Kordic and a few of them were landing. Kordic threw a few punches himself and a couple of them landed in what was a fairly close fight, but I always viewed that fight as an upset win for Stewart and it really made me take notice of him.

The biggest problem with Al Stewart was his size, obviously. But his biggest asset was his heart and the courage he showed time and time again. In the season when he road shotgun with Troy Crowder, he'd always have to take on the toughest guys on the other team that didn't want to tangle with Crowder. And Stewart did so with reckless abandon, even though the results weren't there.

There is a reason for Stewart's lack of success in the 1990-91 season. Look at his first few fights in the NHL against guys like Rick Tocchet and Scott Stevens. I actually thought Stewart got the edge on Stevens, who was one of the toughest guys in the NHL at the time. The Tocchet fight was pretty close and Stewart also went after one of the all-time legends in Larry Playfair and stood right in there against a much bigger and more experienced fighter and held his own in a pretty close fight that Playfair ended up getting the win in.

The problem is the Devils never kept Stewart up long enough. I'm guessing he didn't have NHL caliber skill and the Devils weren't really known to have a lot of tough guys in the mid-80's, so they buried Stewart in the minors with Maine. In his first 6 years in pro hockey, he only played in 18 regular season games with the Devils. And these were his prime years for fighting. Again, the Devils didn't stock a lot of tough guys until about the 1987-88 season, and even then, guys like Jim Korn and Perry Anderson were a joke and 2 of the biggest backstabbing, jumpers from behind the NHL has ever seen. But I guess they were "better" hockey players or team guys or something and that's why the Devils kept them around, but both Korn and Anderson combined didn't have half the guts Stewart did. With the already tough Ken Daneyko and the emergence of Dave Maley as a solid NHL fighter, Stewart would've been a nice fit on those Devils' teams. But instead, the powers that be kept Stewart down on the farm during his prime years. I'm certain if Stewart would've played at least a couple of seasons in the mid to late 80's, you would've seen a different Stewart then you saw later on.

To make a long story short, Stewart was out of his prime by the time the Devils finally gave him some substantial NHL playing time in 1990-91 when he backed up Troy Crowder on a nightly basis. At this point, Stewart was not equipped to be fighting the NHL's best fighters. Stewart was a heavyweight who played in a middleweight's body and he just couldn't keep up with the demand on him that season. He wasn't big enough and he was out of his prime. He fought 20 times in 41 regular season games and it can be argued that his fight card was better than Crowder's that year. As I said, guys weren't too eager to engage Crowder, who was swathing his path of destruction, so a few of them opted for the smaller and less dangerous fighter in Stewart.

Even though Stewart's win/loss record for the 1990-91 season is terrible, he always stood in there and took the other guy's best shots and hardly ever went down. Look at this fight with Probert, or the McSorley one later on in the year, for that matter. He's fighting guys that are way out of his weight class, and yet he stands right in there and takes a beating, but never tries to bail from the fight, all the while, returning some punches of his own. Stewart had balls the size of watermelons and made from steel.

The only blemish on his resume from that year was an embarrassing loss to Steve Leach. This is when I knew something may be wrong with Stewart, either mentally or physically. The Al Stewart from the 80's would've absolutely murdered a guy like Steve Leach, make no mistake about it. But whatever the case was, there was no excuse for Stewart to lose to one of the worst fighters the NHL has ever seen. Still, I couldn't help but think that something was wrong with Stewart.

Fast forward to the 1991-92 season and Stewart plays the preseason with the Devils and fights Joey Kocur and hangs in there with him in a losing battle, and fights to a draw with Craig Coxe and is easily beaten by Link Gaetz. Then Stewart has the one fight with Dave Brown and again, stands in there in a losing effort, and is traded to the Bruins where he gets into 3 fights in 4 games. Like I said before, I thought Stewart edged out Gaetz in San Jose to get a narrow win. Then Stewart goes into St. Louis and gives Darin Kimble all he can handle in a great, even fight.

At this point, you can't accuse Stewart of picking his spots. Including the preseason, of Stewart's 8 fights in 1991-91, he fought Link Gaetz twice, Joey Kocur, Dave Brown, Darin Kimble and Craig Coxe. And other than the 1st Gaetz fight in the preseason, he held his own in all of the other fights which included 3 of the best fighters to ever lace them up in Brown, Kocur and Gaetz.

And then Stewart all of a sudden retires. We later find out that Stewart was suffering from depression. And there's rumours that he went back to his hometown of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, and was seen working at a local gas station pumping gas. Another rumour had Stewart joining a monastery in an effort to become a monk. I'm not sure if these rumours were ever officially substantiated, but I remember there appeared to be enough evidence at the time that some of this was true. I seem to recall The Hockey News mentioning something about Stewart wanting to become a monk.

Anyway, it was clear that Stewart was dealing with some mental issues at that time that made him take a step back from the game and re-evaluate his life. And I can't say I blame him. Here was a guy who was an undersized tough guy who fought the biggest and the best fighters the game threw at him, but never really seemed to get the respect he deserved. He made a brief comeback the following year attending Winnipeg Jets training camp and playing in the preseason and getting into a few fights but didn't crack the line-up. He was sent down to Moncton of the AHL where he continued to fight some of the best in the minors like Serge Roberge, Rudy Poeschek, Francois Leroux, etc.

So I guess the point I've tried to make in this extended post on Al Stewart is that I take offense to somebody making a blanket statement of his fighting skills by calling him a "punching bag" when it's obvious they know very little about what they are talking about.

In closing, Al Stewart was an undersized guy who feared no one and even though he was over-matched most of the time, he always stepped up to the plate to do battle with the toughest guys on the other team. He may not have won a lot of his fights, but when you are 5'11 and 190 pounds and you're fighting the guys he fought, you can't expect him to do much better than he did. And yet, he always hung in there and tried to return fire and never gave an inch to the biggest and the baddest mofos that the game could throw at him. So to simply call Al Stewart a "punching bag" is doing a huge disservice to the guy and is a slap in the face to him and all of us hockey fight fans that know how tough Al Stewart really was. A guy like him should be praised and his accomplishments noted, instead of being marginalized by such an inaccurate statement based on an ignorance of his career in it's totality.

Needless to say, they don't make them like Al Stewart anymore.



Great post Corson27. I always liked Alan Stewart. He pummelled the seven inches taller Archie Henderson during a bench clearer in the AHL. After watching that I became a fan.
Reply


Fight at 32:12
HeightWeightPunchesBlood
Duration N/AThrownLanded   Big   
 Bob Probert 6'3'' 1220lb 18421Fair Amount
 Troy Crowder 6'4'' 1238lb 181472
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PosterReview
 srehm1
357 fight reviews

Feb 16, 2008 16:46 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
Troy Crowder was really the first test of Bob Probert's reign as heavyweight champ. Crowder had talked about fighting Probert a few years before when he was still in the minors. Clearly Bob Probert was the top dog in the NHL with his dominance established. It wasn't like Crowder was talking about fighting anyone else. These two would set off an epic trilogy with this fight to the delight of hockey fans everywhere.

These two start off in the corner. Both have a loose hold of each other and wind up in a spin. Probert lands a good right as they try to get control. He fires another that goes wide. At this point, Probert steps on a stick and slips. Crowder jumps all over him with rapid-fire rights. Not all of these quick blows land, but as Probert regains his footing Crowder pulls his jersey over his head.

Probert pulls free and attempts a comeback, but his jersey is still over his head. Crowder, meanwhile, continues to poke straight rights at Probert. Crowder does a good job of keeping Probert's jersey over his head. Probert fires rights blindly at Crowder. The refs jump in as Probert gets his head out of his jersey. He tries to throw a right but comes up short. Crowder is able to sneak in a few quick rights when the linesmen get in. As the linesmen pull the pair apart you can see a nice gash under Probert's eye. The blood is smeared on his face making it look much worse then it actually was.

Probert never got going in this bout and stepping on that stick didn't help. Everything went wrong for him in this fight. He stepped on a stick and slipped, got his jersey pulled over his head, and he got bloodied. I would certainly not call this decisive by any means, but a clear win for Crowder. Probert landed a right at the outset, but could not get going.

This fight set the stage for a big rematch. Crowder won the opening skirmish, but Probert would be back. Nothing got Probie's blood up like a loss. He was never able to get his footing in this fight and you can see he wanted Crowder after he got out of his jersey. The hype for the rematch started right away with people circling the date on their calendars when the two teams would next meet.
 chrisY2J
1232 fight reviews

Apr 9, 2017 08:56 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
The NHL heavyweight champion, Bob Probert, meets up with a young leviathan looking to make his mark, Troy Crowder. It was the first game of the regular season, so Crowder was looking to make a name for himself early in the year. Troy was also looking to avenge his teammate Allan Stewart, who took a pounding from Probert earlier in the game.

Probert and Crowder are face to face in a corner and square off, gloves on the ice. They reach out to get grips on each other. As soon as they grab on, Probert throws two big rights, trying to end the fight fast. The first shot misses, but the second one is a booming right-handed punch to the side of the head. The blow jars Crowder's helmet loose, but doesn't slow him down. That punch is about all Probert would get going here in this fight.

After getting clocked by that solid punch to the side of the head, Crowder immediately responds. Troy tags Probert with four or five fast right hands, going over and under and stinging the champ, making him recoil and duck away. As he is getting peppered by the quick rights, Probert steps on a fallen stick and staggers a bit, putting him in an even more precarious spot. Somewhere during this salvo by Crowder, a big cut is opened under Probert's right eye.

With Probert off-balance, Crowder gets the Red Wing's sweater over his head. And now with Probert blinded, Crowder hits him with several quick rights again. Probert throws back but can't see his opponent, and his punches go wide.

Probert, still entangled in his own sweater, tries vainly to come back. He finally works himself free of his jersey. They each throw a couple big straight rights, but Probert is having trouble reaching the Jersey heavyweight. Crowder connects with one and Bob falls short. The linesmen get in there just as Crowder lands one last right hand to the face. Probert has a punch loaded up but wouldn't get a chance to let it fly.

It was a clear victory for Crowder. Troy far outlanded his foe and did a good bit of damage. This was NOT a decisive win for Crowder, merely a clearcut one. Probert was definitely outslugged here, but he didn't get utterly hammered or anything. It is not as if the linesmen had to save him; he was still fighting back when the zebras entered the fray.

The two heavyweights separate and go off, and Probert is marked up and bloodied. The Jersey crowd is roaring enthusiastically. They now have a new hero in Troy Crowder.

This fight made shockwaves throughout the league. Everyone was immediately curious about this previously unknown youngster who handled the best fighter in the NHL. Tough guys on other teams looked to test themselves against this new force to be reckoned with, and a few guys really paid the price.

And everyone looked forward to the next meeting between the Detroit Red Wings and New Jersey Devils, to see if Bob Probert could avenge himself...
 SlapShot
207 fight reviews

Jul 9, 2006 15:32 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
8
Don't mean to disagree with everyone but I see this as a clear Crowder win as opposed to decisive. He and Probert meet near the corner and as they're trading right hands Crowder lands a good one early, and then does what I'm sure a lot of guys tried, but couldn't, and that was to keep Probert's jersey over his head instead of letting him get it off completely. He managed to keep it there and prevented Probert from really being able to return fire while he was freely landing his own right at the same time. Eventually the linesmen step in and separate them, but Probert is still swinging back (albeit w/o much success since he really can't see his target) but I don't see him being saved as much as I just see him losing at this point. Huge win for Crowder at the time it happened because this occurred when Probert was really hitting his peak as the NHL's most feared enforcer. Great job by Crowder but w/o Probert going down, combined with the fact he was still throwing, makes it difficult for me to say decisive.
 hb11
3930 fight reviews

Sep 18, 2006 11:57 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
The fight starts in the corner of the Detroit zone. Probert throws a few rights early, landing a good one before ducking down while Crowder retaliates with a series of rights. Crowder misses most of his early throws but gets the jersey over Probert's eyes and lands a few. Probert comes out of his jersey and takes some more rights. The linesmen arrive and Crowder lands a good shot before they break. Probert misses a return punch. After they separate, Probert skates off with a nasty cut near his right eye. Borderline decisive win for Crowder but I'll call it a clear victory since the linesmen jumped in prematurely, most likely overwrought about Probert's cut.
 SarcasticPillow
19527 fight reviews
135 fight logs

May 19, 2011 12:55 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
6
After Bob Probert is done serving his fighting major with Alan Stewart, he meets up with Troy Crowder who had tried to get a fight going with Probert before he fought Stewart. They square off and Crowder misses trying to grab on with the left while Probert succeeds. Probert throws two rights and weakly lands one before Crowder reaches in and grabs on as Probert connects with a right. Probert drops his head as he gets partly turned around and Crowder throws six rights, landing three which get Probert ducking and leaning away. Probert moves in close to the bigger Crowder and as they wrestle a bit, Probert becomes jerseyed. Crowder throws five rights and connects with one as Probert just tries to pull his jersey down. When he does, the linesmen step in. Probert misses a right and then Crowder misses two rights as Probert tries to get to Crowder. Probert goes down and is then pulled away from Crowder. Probert skates away with a cut under his eye and blooding all over his face. Crowder gets the decision over one of the league's best fighters, landing more punches and cutting him. Pretty good fight.
 BattleshipRules
12621 fight reviews

Jun 20, 2013 18:33 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
Crowder and Probert had a short, but eventful battle. Bob was fighting from a distance in the early seconds of the fight. He landed a partial connect and an average right. Troy missed a punch and landed a couple of decent blows. He landed a couple of body punches.

Probert found out that Crowder was incredibly strong on the inside. Troy had a strong grip on his right shoulder and leaned all of his weight on Bob. He landed a partial connect. The jersey came up over Probert's head. Crowder was able to take advantage.

Troy landed a solid blow, a decent connect, and a pretty good shot. He missed a punch. The refs decided to step in to stop the fight because of the concern that Probert might get badly hurt with the disadvantage of not being able to see. Crowder landed a pretty good shot after the zebras stepped in. Bob missed a right hand.

I rate this as a clear win for Crowder. He landed some very effective shots at the end. He manhandled Probert and surprised him with his tremendous strength on the inside and exceptional punching power. Bob was a bloody mess at the end of the bout.
 EddieShore
912 fight reviews

Oct 16, 2006 19:24 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
These two heavyweights square off in the corner of the rink. Probert grabs the front of Crowder's jersey and throws a couple of solid rights early on, one hit its mark nicely. Crowder quickly retaliates and throws six hard rights at Probert who clearly is bothered by them as he turns away for a moment. No damage done yet though. But after they hold on to each other for a short while, Crowder manages to pull Probert's jersey over his head. Crowder takes advantage of the situation and throws four rights at Probert who at this point has his face hidden behind his jersey. It seems that it is during this exchange that Crowder manages to cut Probert. When Probert comes out of his jersey the linesmen intervene, too early IMO as Probert should have gotten the chance to come back. Crowder manages to get in a last right that connects. Probert in turn only manages to throw a lame right that only catches air. Probert is bleeding profusely from his right eye/eyebrow as he is skating away. Strong showing by Crowder who smartly uses Probert's jersey to his advantage in this fight.
 jkidd
141 fight reviews

Apr 29, 2007 14:46 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
5
As the puck moves out of the Detroit zone, these two decide to drop the mits. Probert gets an immediate grasp on the sweater and throws a grazing shot, then a right that lands right on the forehead. Crowder gets a hold on the back of Probies sweater and starts to land some jackhammer rights (6 rights, 4 to the face - 2 to the back of the head), over and under to the face and back of the head. Then Crowder gets a great grip on the backs of the shoulders of Probert, then throws 5 unanswered rights, while Probie is in the midst of sipping the sweater off. As soon as the sweater comes off, or at least gets far enough off to allow him to throw the right - the refs jump in and break it up.

Its a win for Troy Crowder - but I dont see it being one where the refs saved Probert. The jersey is pretty much off and Probie is already getting the right set to throw as they moved in.
mullet
19546 fight reviews

Nov 17, 2004 09:08 ET
Troy Crowder decisive win Fun 
7
Big win for Crowder. He landed some big rights on Probie, who was cut pretty good.
Joonibal
142 fight reviews

Nov 9, 2005 12:47 ET
Troy Crowder decisive win Fun 
8
Crowder lands a few glancing rights to start off. He then has Probert's jersey over his head and seems to connect more solidly (perhaps this is where Probert got cut). The referees come in and break it up.

I kinda wish that they'd let it continue. Probert was free and ready to throw again when the referees jumped in.
CDD
4419 fight reviews
4 fight logs

Dec 10, 2006 23:00 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
6
Billiam
553 fight reviews

Dec 11, 2006 14:05 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
6
goleafsgo987
886 fight reviews

Dec 29, 2006 13:33 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
6
zolika
1896 fight reviews
74 fight logs

Jan 4, 2008 15:31 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
TowerOfRome
168 fight reviews

Feb 3, 2009 19:42 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
6
Boy Troy Crowder must have had a pretty good season. I seen him whoop up on four people in 90-91, I'm gonna have to go back and look at his record but damn.

Near the boards, they drop the mits and Crowder just belts him a couple times then get Probie spun around and whooped up on him a little more. Crowder may have gotten a little tired ( and maybe not) towards the end. But I did not see much fight in Probert even at the end. Poor showing. Win Crowder.
Buffalogotcheated99
567 fight reviews

Feb 11, 2009 20:35 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
skylineProbi
52 fight reviews

Feb 8, 2010 13:00 ET
Troy Crowder narrow win Fun 
6
dirty victory of Crowder is gained by jersey closing the head of Probi result blood on face of Probi
crosbyXXX
3696 fight reviews

Sep 27, 2012 18:14 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
Probert second fight in the match but there is already so clearly contrary Crowder gives a few hard punches and wins, Probert bleeding
brawler29
1538 fight reviews

Oct 7, 2012 11:14 ET
Troy Crowder decisive win Fun 
6
Penguins.Bees.Fan82
3232 fight reviews

Mar 10, 2014 16:28 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
SteveTheBossBosse29
3215 fight reviews

May 16, 2014 06:13 ET
Troy Crowder decisive win Fun 
7
Oneill.the.Giant
11126 fight reviews

Jul 7, 2014 19:23 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
8
TheDanLine
10197 fight reviews

Jul 23, 2015 13:18 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
itsJ.Millertime
10555 fight reviews

Nov 4, 2015 23:14 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
supersonic
4666 fight reviews

Apr 9, 2017 07:37 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
6
scottygiroux
771 fight reviews

Nov 14 15:35 ET
Troy Crowder clear win Fun 
7
Messages
Billiam
Dec 11, 2006 14:05 ET
Reply
chrisY2J
Dec 10, 2007 08:19 ET
Stepping on the stick was not THAT big a factor in Probert's loss here. He was already getting tagged when he stepped on that fallen stick.Reply
Anthony19
Oct 29, 2008 15:02 ET
No watch it again. As soon as he stepped on the stick Crowder then tagged him. It was even til then.Reply
chrisY2J
Oct 29, 2008 15:12 ET
The stick was not a factor in this loss. Crowder's right fist was already cruising in when Probert stepped on that stick. Probert was gonna lose this particular battle, stick or no stick.Reply
chrisY2J
Jul 24, 2010 07:53 ET
Are you still certain about that "decisive" call?Reply
mullet
Jul 28, 2010 08:41 ET
I don't think theres anything wrong with that call, it was a beating IMOReply
chrisY2J
Jul 29, 2010 10:03 ET
Crowder outslugged Probert and definitely applied a beating. But was Probert in a helpless position at the end? He was still swinging.Reply
JimMcKenzie
Apr 24, 2014 14:48 ET
Reply
TheDanLine
Nov 10 10:48 ET
Red Wings feed:
Reply


Fight at 32:17
HeightWeightPunchesBlood
Duration N/AThrownLanded   Big   
 Dave Barr 6'1'' 2195lb 5N/AN/AN/AN/A
 Allan Stewart 5'11'' 2190lb 5N/AN/AN/A
   Added By no.7      Log in or Register to edit this event's boxscore      Review this event      Post Message about this event      Loved/Hated/Top 10      Compare these fighters   
PosterReview
 JimMcKenzie
3935 fight reviews

Aug 18, 2007 16:59 ET
Draw Fun 
6
This was a nice wild scrap. They both threw lefts and rights. Although most of the punches didn't do much damage there was at least no wrestling. Barr had trouble with his balance and fell down to his knees 2x in this fight.
brawler29
1538 fight reviews

Oct 7, 2012 11:14 ET
Draw Fun 
7
This a good fight, both threw lefts and rights, hooks and uppercuts. It looked pretty even to me. Surprising to hear Mickey Redmond diss Joey Kocur in-directly as he said Probert has to do way too much of the fighting for the Red Wings and praised Barr for helping him out.
itsJ.Millertime
10555 fight reviews

Jun 27, 2016 15:06 ET
Draw Fun 
6
Decent fight, Barr starts fast landing some rights and controlling the early action but Stewart comes back hard with lefts to even it up making this fight a draw.
TheDanLine
10197 fight reviews

Nov 10 10:50 ET
Draw Fun 
6
BattleshipRules
12621 fight reviews

Nov 10 10:57 ET
Draw Fun 
6
supersonic
4666 fight reviews

Nov 10 11:02 ET
Draw Fun 
6
Messages
itsJ.Millertime
Jun 27, 2016 15:05 ET

1:33:00
Reply
TheDanLine
Nov 10 10:51 ET
Reply


Cheap Shot at 49:10
HeightWeightBlood
Added By TheDanLine
Log in or Register to edit this event's boxscore
Review this event
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Loved/Hated/Top 10
Compare these fighters
Duration N/A
 Lee Norwood  (Aggressor) 6'1'' 1198lb 2None
 John MacLean  (Victim) 6'0'' 1200lb 2
PosterReview
TheDanLine
10197 fight reviews

Sep 17, 2016 23:54 ET
 Dirty 
8
 Emotion 
5


Scrum at 49:12
Detroit PlayersNew Jersey Players
Duration N/A  Dave Barr  Jimmy Carson  Gerard Gallant  Lee Norwood  Rick Zombo     Tommy Albelin  Bruce Driver  John MacLean  Peter Stastny   
# Players Involved: N/A
Blood: N/A
   Added By Samuelsson      Log in or Register to edit this event's boxscore      Review this event      Post Message about this event      Loved/Hated/Top 10   
PosterReview
Samuelsson
14082 fight reviews

Jan 16, 2014 14:07 ET
It was a nice scrum before Gallant-Albelin fight. Fun 
3
Messages
vsurov2
Jan 25, 2014 02:10 ET
DET - Gallant ( (maj)) 9:12 ; DET - Norwood 9:12 ;
NJ - Albelin ( (maj)) 9:12 ; NJ - Stastny 9:12 ;
Reply
vsurov2
Nov 11 02:14 ET
09:12 DET Lee Norwood: Roughing - 2 min
09:12 NJD Peter Stastny: Roughing - 2 min
09:12 DET Gerard Gallant: Fighting - 5 min
09:12 NJD Tommy Albelin: Fighting - 5 min
Reply


Fight at 49:12
HeightWeightPunchesBlood
Duration N/AThrownLanded   Big   
 Gerard Gallant 5'10'' 4190lb 5N/AN/AN/AN/A
 Tommy Albelin 6'2'' 4195lb 5N/AN/AN/A
   Added By no.7      Log in or Register to edit this event's boxscore      Review this event      Post Message about this event      Loved/Hated/Top 10      Compare these fighters   
PosterReview
 brawler29
1538 fight reviews

Oct 7, 2012 11:12 ET
Draw Fun 
2
John MacLean is down and hurt after getting nailed by Lee Norwood. It develops into a scrum and Gallant and Albelin decide to fight. Albelin actually throws a couple of rights as he leans into Gallant, but doesn´t seem to land anything. Then it becomes a pure wrestling match, and it's difficult to see all of it as the camera shifts to a srawling MacLean is is really stunned as he's laying on his back on the ice. Albelin and Gallant wrestle a little more when the cameras get back to them. From the footage I did not see another punch other than those weak attempts by Albelin at the start.
TheDanLine
10197 fight reviews

Nov 10 10:53 ET
Draw Fun 
3
supersonic
4666 fight reviews

Nov 10 11:02 ET
Draw Fun 
3
Messages
TheDanLine
Nov 10 10:53 ET
Reply

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